Swarthmore Swim Club Presents…

High School Musical

This year’s water show presentation at the Swarthmore Swim Club was Disney’s High School Musical, directed by Abby Dawes of Swarthmore.

The show, held last Thursday, July 21, featured a cast of energetic swimmers, guards and assistant managers.

Bounces, Bumps, and Conventions: Deep Inside the Wells Fargo Center Wearing My PoliSci Hat

By Rick Valelly

Swarthmore College professor of Political Science Rick Valelly on the floor of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

Swarthmore College professor of Political Science Rick Valelly on the floor of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

So far as I know there were (besides me) only two other political scientists inside the Wells Fargo Center this past Monday night. The other two were from Georgetown University — and they have been on the campaign trail all of 2016 with their students in tow. I think that was it for the political science profession this week in Philadelphia.

On the other hand, literally thousands of journalists, famous and not so famous, could be seen throughout the first floor hallway and inside the arena. In fact I managed to have my own brush with journalistic fame. I shook hands late Monday afternoon with Chris Hayes, the MSNBC news hour host, and told him that I’m a fan (which I am.) He gripped my hand earnestly and looked me in the eyes. “That means so much to me.” Then he swooped past with a staffer twice his age trailing him. (Hey, I knew that he didn’t mean it. I’m not bitter about that.)

So why do political scientists not attend party nominating conventions — but journalists do? Part of the answer is that political scientists usually need a press credential. Most political scientists in America don’t happen to have a generous local community newspaper like this one, willing to put in the time and effort to secure a press credential, as The Swarthmorean did for me. That was how I happened to be smiling at Chris Hayes and having him look at me coolly with an “uh oh, not another eager fan” wariness in his eyes.

But another part of the answer is that political scientists have long thought that campaigns — and by extension nominating conventions and the fall candidate debates — do not strongly affect the final outcome of the general election. Unless you are an avid student of party organization and candidate selection rules why attend the conventions? You may feel like you are watching history-in-the-making (you are.) But it isn’t the kind of history that will change the result on Election Day. That’s PoliSci 101 about conventions.

Conventions certainly are useful gatherings for party activists. They get a chance to satisfy their passions. Conventions matter, too, for the important task of hammering out the platform. Political scientists have found that by the time presidents leave office they have honored, in one way or another, about 80% of the platform on which they ran. Conventions also offer that part of the public which has not been paying much attention up to that point a chance to brush up on what’s going on. There are several nights during which they can start to learn about the protagonists in the contest, particularly about the one that they have some inkling they will vote for.

Matt Stewart of Swarthmore, a Strath Haven alumnus and Tufts University political science major, has worked this summer as an intern for the Democratic National Convention Host Committee. “I work in volunteer organization and occasionally in communication, based at 1735 Market Street. We get kits together for volunteers and handle hundreds of e-mails a day, dealing with logistical oversights or problems. I’ve also been to the convention. Monday night was something special. The Bernie Sanders speech was great — he made it explicit that he was disappointed not to be the nominee, but he saw this as the best step in the right direction toward his causes. We can’t support any one candidate, but the Sanders campaign has made people realize they have the power to make a political difference.”

Matt Stewart of Swarthmore, a Strath Haven alumnus and Tufts University political science major, has worked this summer as an intern for the Democratic National Convention Host Committee. “I work in volunteer organization and occasionally in communication, based at 1735 Market Street. We get kits together for volunteers and handle hundreds of e-mails a day, dealing with logistical oversights or problems. I’ve also been to the convention. Monday night was something special. The Bernie Sanders speech was great — he made it explicit that he was disappointed not to be the nominee, but he saw this as the best step in the right direction toward his causes. We can’t support any one candidate, but the Sanders campaign has made people realize they have the power to make a political difference.”

But nominating conventions — and the campaigns that happen after them up until Election Day — do not make or break a candidacy. This is where the famous political science finding that “campaigns don’t matter” comes in. Candidates are, after all, generally equally skillful (albeit in different ways), equally liked (or hated), equally well-resourced, equally competitive on the ground, and equally good at putting on a prime-time portrayal of their party’s stances. Most important, they have equally high “floors.” That is, in every presidential election year about 80-85% of partisan identifiers in the electorate already know before the nominating convention that they will vote in the end for their party’s nominee.

Even political parties that look divided during the four days of the convention do not really suffer. Most voters — 9 out of 10 — have partisan identification. The independent voter turns out to be mostly a myth; 3 out of 10 people may say they are independents if asked by a survey — but the follow-up questions will sort them into red or blue. Because voters are partisan they will get over any sense of discontent and “come home” on Election Day. The alternative is seeing the other party win.

If campaigns cancel each other out then what are the variables that affect the outcome? Call them “the fundamentals.” There are four: (1) the underlying balance of partisan identifiers (2) the relative partisan cohesion of group bases (such as whites without college degrees, Latinos, African-Americans, evangelicals, and so on) (3) whether the economy is really and actually good or bad, and (4) whether “time for a change” sentiment is strong enough to affect many voter decisions — which it usually is after a political party has held the White House for two terms in a row. Each election features relatively slight but numerically large shifts in these variables. New voters come into the electorate for the first time and choose identification with one party of the other at registration (perhaps because of group identification or perhaps because of the partisan identification of friends or parents.)  Voters temporarily defect from their party by switching their votes (or effectively defect by not showing up.) Usually inactive identifiers become passionate about their candidate or truly repelled by one of the candidates. Some of these movements cancel each other out, but the net effect will be in one direction. This is the margin where elections are won.

But isn’t a more nuanced view of conventions possible, one that retains some causal role for campaigns and conventions possible? What about the famous “bounces” that candidates have after their nominating conventions, or after they seem to win a debate?

Swarthmoreans Sarah Graden (left), an observer, and Jennifer Lentz, a delegate for Hillary Clinton, attended Tuesday night’s session of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.Sarah: “I am so energized by this. Politics is my hobby, and I try to get involved locally, and I am co-chair of a political action committee for the National Association of Social Workers. It felt incredible to be able to say ‘aye’ as part of the voice vote that nominated the first woman candidate for President.” Jennifer:  “It’s historical, exciting, and moving to be here for the nomination of Hillary Clinton. At the same time, I have a lot of empathy for Bernie Sanders and his supporters. I didn’t expect that. The convention is more fun and less work than I expected, and I have learned a lot from the daytime sessions.”

Swarthmoreans Sarah Graden (left), an observer, and Jennifer Lentz, a delegate for Hillary Clinton, attended Tuesday night’s session of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.Sarah: “I am so energized by this. Politics is my hobby, and I try to get involved locally, and I am co-chair of a political action committee for the National Association of Social Workers. It felt incredible to be able to say ‘aye’ as part of the voice vote that nominated the first woman candidate for President.” Jennifer: “It’s historical, exciting, and moving to be here for the nomination of Hillary Clinton. At the same time, I have a lot of empathy for Bernie Sanders and his supporters. I didn’t expect that. The convention is more fun and less work than I expected, and I have learned a lot from the daytime sessions.”

I thought a lot about bounces back in 1988 when Michael Dukakis had one of the largest bounces in history, went off to Martha’s Vineyard, and took a long (really long) vacation, figuring that he would get back to work after Labor Day. Every afternoon during my Vineyard vacation I jogged by his house and seriously thought about barging in to grab him by the lapels (“Mike, I’m a Swarthmore College graduate too and I need to talk to you!”) and tell him to get back to campaigning. By Labor Day, Dukakis’ astounding bounce had literally vanished. If he had kept up the campaign couldn’t he have hung onto his bounce and turned it into a “bump” — that is, a 1 or 2 point increment in public support that would stick with him until November?

You’ve probably been thinking about bounces, too. Since his nominating convention Donald Trump has gotten a bounce – even though he had a disastrous convention. Hillary Clinton had a great convention this week. Won’t she get a bounce?

Who is going to come out ahead by a point or two after the dust settles? Or will the polls go back to where they were before the conventions, i.e. with Hillary having a slight lead?

Some percentage of the electorate makes up its mind for the first time during the conventions, yes. Yes, by the time surveys have sorted out what vote intentions are after these two weeks it is possible for one candidate to have an edge.

But here’s the but: that edge is fragile and is likely to crumble as other voters who still have not made up their minds end up making a choice in their minds — and start responding to surveys between now and Election Day. The polls are still not accurate; they are going to become increasingly accurate and as they do the bump, if there is one, will vanish. Maybe Dukakis knew that and figured that he could take a well-deserved rest.

Wait, you’re thinking, if that’s true — that the bump can crumble — then that must mean that the campaigning between now and election day matters! Why else would undecided voters be making up their minds between now and then and thereby eroding whatever bump that one or the other candidate will seem to have by next week?

That’s where PoliSci 102 comes in — the newer political science about the ways in which campaigns do matter after the conventions are over. This year is turning out to be a very suspenseful year from the perspective of that newer political science about kinds of campaign — and the difference that different kinds of campaigns historically have made. Tune in next week for that discussion.

Swarthmore Showcase

First Annual Talent Show

The Swarthmore Public Library is hold its first annual “Swarthmore Showcase” — a talent show for children entering grades 2 through 8 — on Wednesday, August 10, at 6 p.m., in the Central Park amphitheatre.

Register as a solo act, grab a friend, or form a group. Each act will be given a 3-minute time slot to perform whatever their special talent may be — telling jokes, singing, dancing, magic, juggling, presenting art work, playing an instrument, reading an original poem or story… ANYTHING!

An optional rehearsal will be held in the amphitheater on Monday, August 8, at 4:30 p.m.

To register, e-mail Miss Devon at swcsd@delcolibraries.org by Friday, August 5, with the following information:
• The name/s and number of particpant/s;
• The name of the act;
• What talent you’d like to display.

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Eagle Project Enhances Little Crum Creek Park

Eagle Scout candidate John Crawford stands with one of four tables handcrafted for use in Little Crum Creek Park.

Eagle Scout candidate John Crawford stands with one of four tables handcrafted for use in Little Crum Creek Park.

When Eagle Scout candidate John Crawford of Swarthmorewood met Sue Kelly of Swarthmore’s Environmental Advisory Committee, he learned that the EAC had furniture on its wish list for the park, and a plan was hatched. Aided by other Scouts and leaders of Boy Scout Troop 112 in Swarthmore, Crawford made big changes in Little Crum Creek Park over the last two weekends.

“My Eagle Project was the design and construction of six benches and four tables, using a combination of pressure treated lumber and composite decking for structural integrity, safety and resistance to the elements. The project consisted of two primary work days, the first one being Sunday, July 17, in which we cut all the wood and decking to the correct size at my house.”

On the following Friday, July 22, Swarthmore’s Public Works Department contributed its services by transporting all the materials to Little Crum Creek Park.

The major work day was Saturday, July 23, John says. “We worked from 8 in the morning to 4:30 in the afternoon, assembling of the tables and benches. It is my hope that more people will come to Little Crum Creek Park,” John said, “to enjoy the new furniture.”

Scouts and leaders from Boy Scout Troop 112 work on new furniture last Saturday (left to right) Top: Ted Drew, Chuck Kropac, CJ Rooney, Dave Heinbockel, John Crawford, Joe Crawford, Anthony Foglio, Chuck Schiffer, Isaac Lind, Bottom: Peter Armour, Wes Hull, Carter Kropac, Joe Schiffer, Josh Crawford, Tivi Fox, Boy Scouts who helped but are missing from photo include Brendan Carr, Jonathan Cresson, Jonah Horwitz, Ben Kropac, and Gabe Spinosa.

Scouts and leaders from Boy Scout Troop 112 work on new furniture last Saturday (left to right) Top: Ted Drew, Chuck Kropac, CJ Rooney, Dave Heinbockel, John Crawford, Joe Crawford, Anthony Foglio, Chuck Schiffer, Isaac Lind, Bottom: Peter Armour, Wes Hull, Carter Kropac, Joe Schiffer, Josh Crawford, Tivi Fox, Boy Scouts who helped but are missing from photo include Brendan Carr, Jonathan Cresson, Jonah Horwitz, Ben Kropac, and Gabe Spinosa.

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Working hard building tables.

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Letters to the Editor…

Pictured are the volunteer instructors (l. to r.): Cole Wirth, Max Carp, Aidan Frick, DJ Shelton, Rachel Carp, Charlotte Brake, Katie Fisher, Virginia Foggo, and Peter Foggo. (Not pictured are Jack Thomas, Zack Irons, Eleni Pappas, Jane Zeigler, William Brake, Hunter Clements, and Susan Brake.)

Pictured are the volunteer instructors (l. to r.): Cole Wirth, Max Carp, Aidan Frick, DJ Shelton, Rachel Carp, Charlotte Brake, Katie Fisher, Virginia Foggo, and Peter Foggo. (Not pictured are Jack Thomas, Zack Irons, Eleni Pappas, Jane Zeigler, William Brake, Hunter Clements, Spencer Seaman, Carly Glassford, Chloe Brennan and Susan Brake.

CCC singers become swimmers

To the Editor:

For the past two years, we have had the honor of teaching the youngest members of the Chester Children’s Chorus to swim during their five-week Summer Program. Now learning to swim is one of the highlights of the day, thanks to many high school and college volunteers.

Each of the more than a dozen volunteers works closely with two or three children. This provides an opportunity to build trust in the water, so that the children feel comfortable learning and practicing their new skills.

It’s amazing to see the progress that the children make after ten lessons. Several of the 3rd graders are now swimming independently. And almost all of the older 4th graders are able to swim an entire length of the pool, tread water for 15 seconds or more, and, in many cases, dive into the deep-end.

Water Safety Topics are also covered each week, and the children love chanting the catchy phrases, like “Swim in a pair near the lifeguard chair,” “Look before you leap,” and “Reach or throw don’t go.”

None of this would be possible if it weren’t for the volunteers, many of whom take time off from their lifeguard jobs at local pools to help for two hours each Tuesday and Thursday afternoon over five weeks.

Swarthmore College has graciously offered its pool to CCC for these lessons. And, each Friday, the Ridley YMCA has opened up the Ridley High School pool for free swimming. This is when the children can practice their new skills and just enjoy the water. Many of the children don’t have access to pools like the children in the Swarthmore/Wallingford communities.

Beyond teaching a lifelong skill the children can enjoy, these lessons are about public safety. Rates of drowning among inner city children are five times higher than for suburban children. We think that is plainly unacceptable. Plus, it’s been a joy to get to know these kids so well. They are both tireless and filled with boundless energy and joy.

We are grateful to CCC for welcoming the program, to Swarthmore College for opening its beautiful pool, and, most of all, to the many volunteer instructors!

If you’re interested in learning more, check out the CCC website where you can find a video of the Swim Program.

Charlotte and Susan Brake
Swarthmore

Miguel and Ana update

To the Editor:

It has been about a year, and many of you have written me, asking for an update on Miguel, the hard-working and bright-eyed Swarthmore garbage collector whose hand was crushed during an on-the-job accident. Last summer our community came together and pooled the funds to pay for his daughter’s first semester at community college and provide all of her books; created a career of house cleaning jobs for Miguel’s wife, Ana; introduced them to community resources they would never have known about; and equally important: provided a sense of value for Miguel, that he in fact was not “invisible” in our community but rather appreciated by so many for his strong work ethic and warm heart. All of the cards sent along with the gifts of money meant so very much to him and he has kept each one.

I met with Miguel and Ana today and as usual their gratitude and humility is always striking. After a year of physical therapy, Miguel received the grave news that his hand will never be the same again. This is hard for a man who truly loved his job and misses it every day. He spends his days working on the computer and English language program that were donated to him by Swarthmoreans, and feeding and caring for the homeless animals in his neighborhood. He is so positive, as is Ana, who expresses the wonder and relief she feels at getting to come to Swarthmore several times a week to clean houses and be in such a peaceful environment. As Miguel said to me today, “Swarthmore made everything much better. Much better.”

I asked Miguel how he was recovering from the trauma of the accident and he admits it is still a struggle. I looked at them both with their big, tired smiles on their faces and I thought that after the life of hard work and sacrifice they have lived and after the past year of trauma: they need a vacation. I said to Ana, “Where is your dream vacation?” She looked at Miguel, “Two nights in Cape May, right, Miguel? The beach? I always hear how beautiful Cape May is.” “Me, I like the beach,” Miguel said, and then asked me about my trip I had taken this summer.

And as I spoke, I kept thinking that in recovering from trauma in particular, it is important to get away and be in a place void of stress. So I would like to start a little beach fund for them for anyone who would like to contribute. They have no idea that I am doing this, so if no one contributes, no harm. But even if a bunch of people contribute a bit, it would provide a fabulous and healing gift for them that many of us take for granted each summer. If you are interested, please let me know at lisasitta@hotmail.com. Thank you!

Lisa Croddy
Swarthmore

Unwritten code…

To the Editor:

I have found that the person quickest to accuse others of lying is often the person to whom lying comes naturally. This is the case for Mr. Trump, who tells lots of outright lies and disguises the whoppers by prefacing them with “Many people say,” a common tactic of demagogues wishing to spread a lie while avoiding responsibility.

As of this writing, his most recent lie was a few hours ago when he talked about how much criminality has increased in recent years, when in fact there has been a downward trend in criminality for two decades. Realizing that the recent murders of police officers and killings of unarmed minorities by police has created a perception of a “trend” in lawlessness, he couldn’t resist using these tragic deaths to score political points.

Mr. Trump claims that he will be the “law and order candidate” but was light on specifics as to how he would reverse his imagined crime wave. I can help.

He can urge support for the accountability measures outlined in the President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing report, a milestone in the effort by law enforcement professionals to better protect both their officers and the communities they serve. He can urge accountability not only for what officers do, but also for what they don’t do when they fail to expose significant abuses of authority by their fellow officers.

I have conducted studies of the justice system, including evaluations of police departments, for 20 years. Historically, in many departments there has been an unwritten “code of silence”: an officer must not expose or speak out about a fellow officer who is disrespectful or abusive, behaviors experienced disproportionately in communities of color. In extreme cases, officers may file false incident reports to cover up misconduct, or fail to provide incriminating information, even when a fellow officer’s misconduct rises to the level of criminal acts.

Ending the code of silence is not easy, but it may be the most important step that can be taken toward improving relationships between police and minority communities, and securing the safety of both officers and citizens.

Grant Grissom
Media

Briefly Noted…

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Tickets to the eleven-Tony Award-winning play Hamilton are worth much more than their weight in gold. Hence the delighted smiles of Swarthmoreans Jack and Nikki Cavanaugh, who were the winners of the recent WHYY-FM Hamilton contest, which involved more than 5,000 member entries. The Cavanaughs took home a package including two tickets to a September performance of the phenomenal musical, as well as dinner at New York restaurant Felidia.

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Matt Chansky, a member of Strath Haven’s Class of 1984, has published his first novelette, A Good Man Henry, available as an eBook online at amazon.com. The printed version will be released later this year.

Matt’s story centers around a hard-working family man, Henry Robinson, being told that he’s dying of “failure.” His routine is turned upside down as he struggles to stay right side up. The book is a vehicle for exploring the ups and downs that Millennials and Generation Z face today.

Matt, the son of Norman and Elissa Chansky of Swarthmore, is an award-winning designer in the advertising field.

Lap Swimmers: This week’s winners of the turquoise with navy writing 2016 1,000-lap T-shirt at Swarthmore Swim Club include: 43.) Peter Bloom, 44.) Katie Stack, 45.) Carl Drott, 46.) Kristen Herzel, 47.) Betsy Larsen, 48.) David Heinbockel, 49.) Lynn Falk, 50.) Stephen Scharschan, 51.) Susan Larson, 52.) Jennifer Lenway, 53.) Jonathan Hodgson, and 54.) Lindy Giammattei.

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Charlie Seymour, Jr. of Wallingford checked in from summer vacation: The Seymour family first started its annual vacation in Ocean City, N.J., in the 1980s, and the tradition was picked up again in 2012 when Charlie and Pam took their children and grandchildren. Beckett, nearly five, loves “the city house,” arcades, amusement rides, and eating ice cream. Never the bashful one, he showed Granddad (Charlie) how blue his tongue became after a treat on the boardwalk one hot evening. Pure joy!

Floating Photographer

By Jennifer Reynolds

What does it mean to you to see the first woman
nominated by a major party for President?

Asked in Rose Valley and Wallingford

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It’s exciting. It’s about time. But to be perfectly frank, I look forward to a time when gender is no longer an issue.

Suzanne Barton
Rose Valley

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It makes me happy and proud to see a woman running for president, but for my children to think this is the norm is the more significant point.

Lauren Conway (left)
Wallingford

“It’s about time” is my first response. This is an incredibly exciting time and as Michelle Obama said, “Because of Hillary Clinton, all our sons and daughters now take for granted that a woman can be president of the United States.”

Dana Pickup
Wallingford

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A female presidential candidate, while exciting and groundbreaking for the US, does not override the basic truth that Hillary Clinton is also the most qualified person in this election cycle. Competence and knowledge should be the standards we hold our elected officials to, regardless of gender. It is worth noting that by elevating a female to our highest office we join some of the most powerful countries in the world, and break down another barrier to achievement for all Americans.

Mary Herzog
Rose Valley

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I’m really thrilled. I didn’t think I would see this day, and I only wish my mother and grandmother were here to see it, too.

Winnie Host
Wallingford

The July Gardener

By Pete Prown

Mid-summer is a notoriously tough time in the garden, the moment when your ornamental plants show early signs of stress and heat damage. But there is hope. Bill Thomas, executive director at Chanticleer Garden in Wayne, Pa., once told me that the best strategy for mid-summer color involves, “The three H’s – hydrangea, hibiscus, and heptacodium.” These are all tough performers that can beat the heat and produce much-needed color in July and August. Other choices include daylilies, St. John’s wort, buddleja, smoke bush, crape myrtle, and a host of other heat seekers.

Your May plantings of annuals should be reaching their zenith, especially since we’ve had a steady cycle of rain, followed by heat and sun, in Delaware County. If you were lucky enough to visit the Swarthmore Horticultural Society’s salvia sale in spring, you’re likely reaping the fruits of your labors, as both the annual and perennial cultivars they offered are blooming wildly now. If you missed it, make sure to grab some new salvias for your 2017 garden, either perennials to plant this fall or new ones for next year. Salvias are superior and rugged summer champions.

Hydrangea macrophylla is one of the most popular and durable plants for summer color. Photo by Jennifer Reynolds

Hydrangea macrophylla is one of the most popular and durable plants for summer color. Photo by Jennifer Reynolds

You may notice, however, that even with regular deadheading, some tender annuals such as petunias are starting to get leggy in the heat. At this point, you may want to bite the bullet and cut them back, hoping for a Labor Day comeback. Or do what many garden professionals do — throw them on the compost pile and replant with fresh annuals.

You may think that this is the expensive and wasteful option, but if you’ve ever been to a public garden and wondered how they keep their beds, pots, and baskets blooming so profusely all summer long, this is the secret. Local garden centers like Mostardi Nursery, Wolfe’s Apple House, and Linvilla should all have new, colorful annuals available for mid-to-late season replanting. Also check the Swarthmore Co-op.

Now the bad news: weeding. With the regular rain and warmth this month, we’ve seen explosive weed and invasive vine growth in our landscapes. There are precious few shortcuts for weed management, aside from mowing the lawn and deploying the weed-whacker.

The best strategy is to stay on top of the growth with regular effort, pulling ground weeds, cutting down fast-growing vines, and watching out for poison ivy. Even if you just put in a half-hour once or twice per week, you’ll make a difference.

For you vegetable gardeners, a good rule of thumb is to pull a few weeds every time you water or harvest delicious edibles. Before you grab that new eggplant or cucumber and proudly dash to the kitchen, grab a few handfuls of green invaders and compost ’em.

At this time of year, you’ll also want to be handy with the hose. Those trees, shrubs, and perennials you planted in the luxury of spring need an extra drink of water — make sure it’s a generous one, as even a little heat stress in July can conceivably kill them this winter. Same in the veggie garden — don’t assume a passing thunder shower will adequately water the plants. Often, rain doesn’t penetrate very deeply, which is why you need to keep that hose or watering can ready at all times. Certainly, a rain barrel makes practical sense, too.

Last thought — if you’re going on vacation, ask a friend or hire a neighborhood kid to keep watering your tender or newer plants. They’ll thank you for it later on.

Swarthmore Borough Council Agenda

Monday, August 1
Swarthmore Borough Hall • 7:30 pm

• Agreement – Professional Pension Plan Investment Consultant Services
• Memorandum of Understanding with Swarthmore College
• 2017 Budget Schedule
• Financial Report
• Manager’s Report

If you are a person with a disability and wish to attend this meeting of Borough Council and require an auxiliary aid or service to participate in the proceedings, please contact Borough Manager Jane Billings at 610-543-4599 to discuss how the Borough may best accommodate your needs.

Swarthmore Discussion Group Sets 2016-17 Speakers

New Thinking in a New Venue

The Swarthmore Discussion Group recently announced its slate of speakers for the 2016-2017 series, which convenes members of the Swarthmore community each month for dinner and discussion of vital issues.

The series has historically attracted great interest, with applications exceeding the number of series memberships available. This year, the series moves to the new Inn at Swarthmore, which will provide a larger room than the series’ former home in Bond Hall of Swarthmore College.

Speakers and subjects include:

• Tim Burke, Swarthmore College History Professor: “Academic Freedom: The Whole World Is Watching.”

• Valerie Smith, Swarthmore College President: “Dealing With Difference: Lessons from the Liberal Arts.”

• Carol Nackenoff, Swarthmore College Professor of Political Science: “What’s Different About the 2016 Elections?”

• Jeffrey Rosen, National Constitution Center President and CEO: “The Curse of Bigness: What Louis Brandeis Means Today.”

• William Reno, Northwestern University Professor of Political Science: “Failing States and the Delusions of U.S. Policies.”

• Aurora Winslade, Swarthmore College Director of Sustainability: “Sustainability: How to Be a Catalyst for Change.”

• David Swanson, Philadelphia Inquirer photographer: “Capturing Moments That Last a Lifetime.”

• Michael Brown, Swarthmore College Professor of Physics & Chair, Physics & Astronomy: “ Fusion Energy: How to Make a Star on Earth.”

Applications for series membership ($300) are due by August 25. Space for individual dinner talks ($45) may be available following that date. More information on the series is available at swatdiscussiongroup.wordpress.com; you can also contact Mary Carr at (610) 957-6132 or mcarr1@swarthmore.edu.