Swarthmore Fire Company’s New/Old Ambulance

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Swarthmore Fire and Protective Association captains Michael Daley (in cab) and Conlen Booth are ready to hit the road in the fire company’s good-as-new ambulance, which just returned to Swarthmore following a “re-chassis.”

“We we put the existing ‘box’ on a new Chevy chassis with a Duramax engine that’s much more reliable than the old machine,” fire company Chief Engineer Rich Cresson said following the ambulance’s return last week. “We had been spending $5,000 or more each year on mechanical repairs and maintenance,” Cresson said.

Since the patient transport area behind the cab does not wear appreciably, and the Swarthmore company has continually upgraded the equipment within, the strategy made abundant sense. Captain Booth said, “Essentially, we have a new ambulance for $144,000 instead of the $200,000-plus retail cost.”

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The fire company’s first responders will roll out in the nearly-new ambulance as soon as it is relicensed. Swarthmore Fire and Protective Association has just launched its fall fund drive, seeking donations from all Swarthmoreans and neighbors, in order to continue staffing with professional and volunteer firefighters and first responders, and maintaining its fleet and facilities to provide optimal emergency services.

Watch your mail for the appeal, and make a donation online at swarthmorefd.org/donations.

Sober Living House Meets ‘Bleak House’

Dung H. Lau (left) was questioned Monday night by attorney Vincent Mancini during the Nether Providence Zoning Hearing Board’s consideration of Lau’s appeal of the citation of his property at 224 N. Providence Road.

Dung H. Lau (left) was questioned Monday night by attorney Vincent Mancini during the Nether Providence Zoning Hearing Board’s consideration of Lau’s appeal of the citation of his property at 224 N. Providence Road.

Jarndyce and Jarndyce were absent, but three attorneys representing parties to the case of a Wallingford “sober living” group residence advocated on behalf of their clients in the third monthly installment of Nether Providence Township’s zoning hearing of the appeal of Providence Recovery House. Wallingford’s version of the Charles Dickens serial novel Bleak House seems destined to continue into its third calendar year.

Monday night’s two and a half hour session involved township solicitor Michael Maddren and Media attorney Vincent Mancini in cross-examination of Dung H. “Gabe” Lau, who as owner of the house at 224 N. Providence Road has been cited for operating a business there, in a district zoned residential. Maddren encouraged Lau to expand on documentary evidence regarding the services provided and uses of the house, the conditions under which residents may come and go, interact with one another and staff, and the contracts, agreements and financial relationships among clients and service providers.

Attorney Mancini pressed Mr. Lau on the nature of the services provided by the sober living house and the related Providence Living addiction treatment facility at 1223 N. Providence Road in Upper Providence Township, which is jointly owned by Mr. Lau and Dr. William Heran. Lau and his attorney, Wendy McLean frequently noted that medical and treatment questions should properly be addressed to Dr. Heran, CEO of the treatment center, when he testifies. Mancini also focused questioning on use of the 224 house and the neighboring property at 218, which was also bought by Mr. Lau, inquiring as to the number of resident, regular visitors and the traffic they generate.

Attorney Davis stressed the burden of the continuing case to prospective witnesses like Dr. Heran, who must clear his schedule of professional appointments to await his turn to testify. Heran will be called to testify on December 19, following the conclusion of cross examination of Lau. Also at the December installment of the hearing, Mancini intends to call as witnesses the parents of Brian Fetterman, who died of a drug overdose in October 2015 while a resident of the sober living house. Once these witnesses have been heard, the ZHB will consider the testimony and make its ruling, most likely not before 2017.

Several among the immediate neighbors of 224 N. Providence Road observing the hearing have established an ad hoc group called the Nether Providence Community Zoning Collaborative. The group has crowdfunded via direct and Paypal donations to npczc224@gmail.com, though members were pessimistic about the prospects for continuing legal representation in the absence of more funding.

Solicitor Maddren noted that while the township and other parties originally planned to separate the zoning hearing and any potential accommodation hearing, he is hopeful that much of the testimony from the zoning matter would be available and applicable to later proceedings, potentially saving time.

200 S. Chester Ave. Appeal Continued

Neighbors of 200 S. Chester Road spoke their piece on Monday night at a special hearing before Swarthmore Borough Council. Council held the hearing to continue receiving public commentary on the appeal of a ruling accommodating a proposed use of the house for multiple families. This exception to the zoning code was made in September by an Accommodation Review Request Board convened in Swarthmore.

Prospective buyers of the property wish to establish a residence for cancer patients and their families during advanced treatment at Philadelphia hospitals. The Headstrong Foundation sought and received the accommodation, excepting it from the address’s nominal residential RB zoning, which prohibits more than three unrelated persons from living together. The foundation has tentatively agreed to purchase the property for about $700,000.

Immediate neighbors and others appealed the ruling in October, citing concerns over traffic, parking, and other safety and quality of life issues.

Proponents of the Headstrong House had spoken during a Borough Council hearing earlier this month. Council will consider the testimony pro and con and announce at its December 5 meeting whether or not it will uphold the accommodation request.

Observations on Lois Dodd

Lois Dodd (center) with List Gallery director Andrea Packard (left) and art critic Faye Hirsch in front of Dodd’s painting “Barn Window with White Square.”

Lois Dodd (center) with List Gallery director Andrea Packard (left) and art critic Faye Hirsch in front of Dodd’s painting “Barn Window with White Square.”

American painter Lois Dodd has persisted in painting her vision, steadfastly following an aesthetic that has evolved slowly, indifferent to art trends and fads, continuing to produce work that is provocative and fulfilling.

Dodd’s work spanning nearly 50 years is collected in a tidy show of a dozen and a half paintings at the List Gallery in Lang Performing Arts Center at Swarthmore College, where she is Donald J. Gordon visiting artist for 2016-17. Vital and wry in her 90th year of age, Dodd visited Swarthmore recently for the opening of the show and a public talk at LPAC with show curator and List Gallery director Andrea Packard and art critic Faye Hirsch, who is cataloguing Dodd’s work over the years.

The show, entitled “Windows and Reflections,” contains paintings united by the theme of vision and observation. Many of the works use windows as a subject, and as a lens on other subjects. Other works use metaphorical windows, framing objects in a geometric convergence of structures or tree branches, and through apertures like bridges or bordered areas such as ponds. The paintings seem uncommonly engaging, appealing to the viewer’s own desire to observe and explore the elements framed by these windows.

Night Window–Red Curtain, 1972 Falling Window Sash, 1992. Oil on linen, 66 x 36 inches Oil on linen, 60 x 38 inches.

Night Window–Red Curtain, 1972 Falling Window Sash, 1992. Oil on linen, 66 x 36 inches Oil on linen, 60 x 38 inches.

Hirsch commented to Dodd that since her early 1950s days as a member of the cooperative Tanager Gallery in New York City’s Chelsea, “You’ve been insistent on painting what you see,” in contrast to the abstract expressionists who were ascendant then. “To me, what I’m painting is abstraction,” Dodd responded, later agreeing with Packard’s observation that her painting is a process of “distilling the complexity in the natural world.”

Many of the works in the show are “life size” canvases and panels that bring the viewer right into the scene, and using this engagement to “speak to you like another human presence,” Faye Hirsch noted. The sense of being not alone, of seeing a hint of someone real or ghostly through the windows, may add a sense of melancholy and retrospect in paintings of derelict buildings [“Window, Abandoned House, Blairstown”], or of possibility and mystery of other lives to views from a Chelsea window [“Night Sky Loft”].

Hirsch further suggested that the window paintings give “a bit of a trompe l’oeil feeling,” in the tradition of American realist painters famously collected at the Brandywine River Museum. Dodd also acknowledged the frequent connections drawn between her work and another famous local, Andrew Wyeth, who shared with Dodd both an affinity for pastoral scenes and a long career painting in Maine. Dodd’s work evokes similar feelings of discovery and agreeable solitude, and a reverence for essential drama of the natural world. Curator Andrea Packard noted to Dodd, “You identify a very striking viewpoint and then you distill it so that it’s remarkable. Your paintings of nature make us understand nature differently.”

Dodd responded, “There are things that nature does that somehow you feel you have to pay attention to and notice. If that apple tree [in “Apple Trees and Shed”] doesn’t want to be noticed, I don’t know what does. There’s nothing you can take for granted about the out of doors, and the fact that everything is changing as you’re looking at it just adds to the excitement. Sometimes I feel like a reporter. Nature’s doing this thing; I have to report it.”

This compact exhibition is delightful, inside and out. It will be at the List gallery in LPAC through December 15. Hurry there, but take your time once you arrive.

Home for the Holidays December 3

Swarthmore Town Center, Inc. presents 

HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS

Saturday, December 3, 2016
9:30 am to 8 pm

9:30 am-1:30 pm Farmers Market – Borough Hall Parking Lot
11:30 am-3 pm Holiday Greens Sale – Scott Arboretum 11:30-1 (members); 1-3 (general public)
2 pm-4 pm Scavenger Hunt (ages 10 & younger) Register at Borough Hall
3 pm-6:30 pm Carriage Rides – The Inn at Swarthmore (Tickets: $12/adults; $7/children 12 & under)
3 pm-5 pm Ornament Making – Borough Hall (Ages 10 & younger)
5 pm-6 pm Swukestra Ukelele Orchestra – Hobbs Coffee
7 pm-7:30 pm Caroling, Tree Lighting & Santa Arrives Borough Hall Lawn
7 pm War3House3 – 100 Park Avenue, Rear Live music: David Coppa & Scrapple
7:30 pm-8 pm Hot Chocolate & Goodies Swarthmore Firehouse

Santa Prepares for Annual Visit!

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Santa Claus is coming to town! Once again, Santa is planning his annual Christmas Eve visit to Swarthmore.

Newcomers to town, however, may be surprised to learn that in Swarthmore, Santa has been making this unique tradition of visiting the children, aged 10 years or younger, in their homes since the 1890s!

Santa arrives between 9 p.m. and 2 a.m. on Christmas Eve to visit for a few magical moments. If you would like Santa to visit your child or grandchild, you can reach Santa’s elves directly by calling (610) 543-0902, Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m., or you can request your visit with the man in the Red Suit by visiting the website www.swarthmoresanta.com.

Letters to the Editor

New views of Springfield Square’s stores and parking lot  from Riverview Road below Baltimore Pike. Photo by Bill Menke

New views of Springfield Square’s stores and parking lot from Riverview Road below Baltimore Pike. Photo by Bill Menke

Fool me once; fool me twice…

To the Editor:

Since moving to Swarthmore in the late 1970s, I have been aware that the deBotton family and National Realty Corporation have desired to migrate commercial uses over the Springfield border into Swarthmore. The first attempt was purchasing the 545 Riverview Road residence (wrongly listed on Zillow.com as in Springfield), and removing almost all the vegetation on the site. After neighbors complained of the apparent commercialization of the site, the deBotton family and National Realty Corporation purchased the adjacent property (541 Riverview). Early attempts to create the 60-foot buffer, as agreed by both Springfield and Swarthmore, included a tall berm and planting emphasizing evergreen species, with which I was involved.

Later, the deBotton family took the cause of forcing Swarthmore to accommodate commercial along this edge and Baltimore Pike to the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, a case which deBotton and National Realty Corporation lost. They have not given up, but instead appear to have redirected their efforts.

Recent redesign of parts of the southern and western buffer with expanded parking and underground water recharge caused a new buffer planting, with which we assisted. Recently, however, major trees and buffer have been removed, opening the view at Baltimore Pike (as shown in the adjacent photo I took recently). In an apparent attempt to open more views into Springfield Square, with the added bonus of making a residence less desirable to either purchase or rent, the vegetation between 541’s rear facade and Springfield Square has been removed, opening a view to the Olive Garden, Fed Ex, and its parking area, in violation of the 1985 agreement.

Numerous neighbors spoke in opposition to these acts and others at the Borough Council meeting on November 14th, and additional exhibits have been forwarded to the Borough and Council representatives. Let’s see that these continued attempts to make Swarthmore residential properties commercial are halted, and the buffer, at the very least, restored.

William Menke
Swarthmore

The joy of Charlie’s Hardware Store

To the Editor:

One of the joys of living in a small town is shopping in village stores that are built on a human scale and where shopkeepers treat me like a real person. I am grateful for the Co-op and the new Inn and Community Store as well as the many fine restaurants, specialty stores and services in the Ville. But today I am reminded of the particular role played by Swarthmore True Value Hardware Store (aka “Charlie’s Hardware”) in sustaining the well-being of the homes and workplaces of many of us.

While my father is an engineer and a contractor, I did not inherit his skill sets. As a consequence, I rely on the local hardware store, not only for supplies, but also for its “social capital,” that is, the store’s network of staff and customers who share their know-how and expertise with technologically-challenged residents such as me.

At Charlie’s store, I have had windows, screens, and lamps repaired; received expert advice on how to maintain the lawnmower and leaf blower I bought at the store; and purchased the just-right bird seed, grass seed, mulch, kitchen tile cleaner, pet stains cleaner, and humane mouse trap I needed. From housewares and paint to electrical supplies and awesome, well-made garden tools, Charlie’s Hardware is professional, friendly, and forgiving of customers, such as me, whose occasional lapses (leaving the weedwacker in the rain) and limited vocabulary (I am still confused about the difference between a throttle and a choke) might make them a bit of a spectacle in a big box hardware store.

More times than not, I have showed off to my wife and children my household and landscaping skills — clean floors, painted rooms, manicured hedges, functioning windows — knowing full well that without Charlie and his staff I would be a lost soul in my home and yard. Very competitively priced in a welcoming atmosphere, Swarthmore True Value Hardware Store is one of the town’s many treasures.

Mark Wallace
Swarthmore

Update on the ‘Yale Avenue Speedway’

To the Editor:

The November Swarthmore Public Safety meeting drew more than 30 people. The first hour consisted of a great deal of public comment on the initial traffic calming methods used on Yale Avenue. Almost every member of the public who spoke agreed that this initial traffic calming method — the speed monitors on opposite sides of Yale — had not significantly reduced speeding.

David Creagan, chair of the Swarthmore Public Safety committee, said that one speed measurement had already been taken and a second one would be taken shortly after Thanksgiving. If that second one also proves that the traffic had not calmed significantly, he said, the committee would consider taking the next step.

One attendee suggested going directly to speed bumps and/or humps. There are speed humps on Jefferson Street in Media, which are inexpensive and work very well. There are funds available for these or any other choices.

Police Chief Brian Craig said that police were not available to monitor any of these intersections on a regular basis. This summary will be discussed at the January Swarthmore Borough Council meeting along with the January Swarthmore Public Safety meeting.

Bob Small
Swarthmore

Grieving and moving forward

To the Editor:

Since our unexpected electoral outcome this month, many in Swarthmore and beyond are processing the loss of more than a national election. We see a vision of compassion, fairness, protecting our environment and seeking peace being repudiated by others locally and across the nation.

This week there are many who are grieving privately, not sure how to face this new day. I write to let you know that you are not alone, and that we can and must maintain hope, so that when ready, we can again move forward.

There are also folks in Swarthmore and beyond who have offered to help bridge this transition from loss to hope. If you or a friend would like to know more, please contact me at swatchair@gmail.com. Thank you.

Colleen Guiney
Swarthmore

Here to grow

To the Editor:

I appreciate the recent thoughts in The Swarthmorean about the “echo chamber.” As a transplant, I am one who struggles with the gift and the challenge of living in a bubble and moving, back and forth, out of the bubble into the world beyond.

I have learned through experience it can be painful to stretch one’s mind, to examine one’s beliefs against those of others, to consciously decide to accept a part of the larger truth, hence the greater good, that has not been one’s particular truth. Yet, as my good doctor from Maryland would say, “We’re not here to be happy or to live an easy life. We’re here to grow.”

That said, I recently read an article in one of the national publications that offers food for thought. The piece, by Frederick M. Hess and Chester Finn Jr., originated in the U.S. News and World Report. Read it here: on.wsj.com/2fym2q3.

Carmen Bruce
Swarthmore

‘Not driven by reason…’

To the Editor:

Larry Drew suggests I study the psychology of rational analysis with regard to those protesting the election of Donald Trump (The Swarthmorean, Nov. 18). But the psychologies of both the left and the right are not driven by reason, but by emotion.

In a sense there is no “psychology of rational analysis.” Psychology arises primarily and more powerfully from the reptilian midbrain which is programmed for short range survival; and the devil take the generations of the more distant future.

John Brodsky
Swarthmore, for www.tomkins.org

What to do? What to know?

Laura Kiehner of Media and Bob Hall of Newtown Square are among the elves working in Swarthmore Presbyterian Church’s Alternative Christmas Shop, opening this Sunday.

Laura Kiehner of Media and Bob Hall of Newtown Square are among the elves working in Swarthmore Presbyterian Church’s Alternative Christmas Shop, opening this Sunday.

SPC Opens Alternative Christmas Shop
on Sundays in Advent

On Sunday, November 27, Swarthmore Presbyterian Church begins its second decade of a holiday shopping tradition that lets givers choose gifts that make the world a little better.

In the Alternative Christmas Shop, shoppers can choose among 23 gifts, priced from $5 to $30, which provide donations to nonprofit organizations whose missions help people in need, worldwide and locally. Givers support these groups in the name of friends and family members, who receive cards sharing information on the donation.

SPC’s Alternative Christmas Shop committee has chosen nonprofits in varied locations from Darby, Pa., to Tanzania to Syria, where even small donations can bring big results. Medical care and meals; school supplies and summer camps; social justice and protection for threatened species; a variety of programs and services appeal to all interests.

ACS is open to members of the community and the congregation following morning worship each Sunday until Christmas from 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Holiday music, cookies and coffee create a festive atmosphere for shopping and celebration in the church’s Fellowship Hall.

Swarthmore Presbyterian Church is located at 727 Harvard Avenue. Information on ACS and the church is at swarthmorepres.org and (610) 543-4712.

Treasures abound at this year’s Handcrafted Holiday Sale at the Community Arts Center.

Treasures abound at this year’s Handcrafted Holiday Sale at the Community Arts Center.

December Opens with Potters Guild
Holiday Preview Party at CAC

The Potters Guild invites Christmas revelers and first-night shoppers to the opening of its annual Handcrafted Holiday Sale on Thursday evening, December 1, from 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. in the Duke Gallery of the Community Arts Center.

This unique preview party rings in the holiday season with good cheer, light refreshments, wine, and music from Joe Holt and the Media Chamber Chorale. During the evening, guests will be browsing and buying fine pottery and crafts from more than 60 local artisans, including 30 members of the Potters Guild. The proceeds from the sale go to support local artists and CAC’s onsite and outreach programming. Admission to the preview party is $5.

The Potter’s Guild sale continues at CAC through December 10, and is open each weekday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and weekends 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

On Friday, December 9, CAC will present a Holiday Jazz Concert with the Cartoon Christmas Trio, featuring the Charlie Brown Christmas music of Vince Guaraldi and holiday cartoon classics. Tickets are $10 for the concert, which runs from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

More information is at cacholidaysale.org. CAC is at 414 Plush Mill Road in Wallingford.

Swarthmore College Chorus and Garnet Singers
at Lang

The Swarthmore College Garnet Singers will perform a set entitled “Birdsongs” that includes music by Arcadelt, Lasso, Gibbons, Schubert, The Beatles and others.

Following them will be the Swarthmore College Chorus with music on the theme of peace, from South Africa and Georgia, as well as works by Guerrero, Bach, Mendelssohn, and Persichetti.

The event will take place on Sunday, December 4, starting at 7:30 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

Concerts At Lang Next Weekend

Two distinctly different orchestras invite you to performances next weekend at Lang Concert Hall.

The Swarthmore College Orchestra, whose 60-plus members include members of the community and students at the college, performs on Friday, December 2, at 8 p.m. Their program, conducted by Andrew Hauze, includes the Act I Finale of Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker and Dvorak’s “New World” symphony.

Gamelan Semara Santi, a classical percussion orchestra of Balinese origin, comprises talented amateur musicians including Swarthmore College undergraduates and members of the community. The orchestra performs classical and modern compositions from Bali during its concert from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. The concerts are free and open to all.

Undergraduates Take the Stage

Student companies from Swarthmore College will show the fruits of their performing arts education in two showcases next weekend, both of which are free and open to the public.

The college’s department of Music and Dance presents its fall 2016 dance concert on Friday, December 2, and Saturday, December 3, at Pearson Hall of Lang Performing Arts Center. Members of the Swarthmore faculty join student dancers in a joyous celebration of ballet, taiko, modern, tap, and other dance traditions. Friday’s performance is at 4:30 p.m. and Saturday’s is at 8 p.m.

Meanwhile, at LPAC’s Frear Ensemble Theatre, Senior Company 2017 interprets The Totalitarians by Peter Sinn Nachtrieb in performances at 8 p.m. on Friday, December 2, and Saturday December 3. There will also be a matinee at 2 p.m. on Saturday.

The Totalitarians is a dark comedy on the state of relationships, political discourse and truth in the modern day. Presented by the Swarthmore College Department of Theater, they play is directed by college senior Cooper Harrington-Fei.

Mimi Haggerty

Mimi Haggerty

The Gathering Place Welcomes Mimi Haggerty

The Gathering Place welcomes Mimi Haggerty, Art Goes to School (AGTS) chapter leader for Wallingford-Swarthmore School District, on Wednesday, November 30, beginning at 12:30 p.m.

AGTS of the Delaware Valley is a nonprofit that brings art appreciation classes to elementary and middle school students. Students are encouraged to “look, listen, and feel” art.

Bring a bag lunch to eat at noon; dessert and beverages are provided. SUMC is at 129 Park Avenue, Swarthmore. For questions, call (610) 952-0649.

TRINITY CHURCH SWARTHMORE TO PRESENT BACH CANTATA. The Choir of Trinity Episcopal Church in Swarthmore will sing its traditional service of Choral Evensong on Sunday, December 11, at 5 p.m. This beautiful service of prayers, readings and music is sung in celebration of the season of Advent. This year’s service will include a performance of J.S. Bach’s famous Cantata 140, “Wachet auf!” (Sleepers, wake!) featuring soloists Tracy Sturgis (soprano) and Matthew Maisano (baritone) and accompanied by chamber orchestra. The cantata, based on the parable of the wise and foolish virgins and texts from the Song of Songs, contains some of Bach’s most beloved and famous music. The choir will also sing works of Palestrina and Lassus. Trinity Church, located at the corner of Chester Road and College Avenue in Swarthmore, welcomes the entire community to join them that evening. Free child care will be provided and a reception will follow the service. For more information, call the parish office at (610) 544-2297.

TRINITY CHURCH SWARTHMORE TO PRESENT BACH CANTATA. The Choir of Trinity Episcopal Church in Swarthmore will sing its traditional service of Choral Evensong on Sunday, December 11, at 5 p.m. This beautiful service of prayers, readings and music is sung in celebration of the season of Advent. This year’s service will include a performance of J.S. Bach’s famous Cantata 140, “Wachet auf!” (Sleepers, wake!) featuring soloists Tracy Sturgis (soprano) and Matthew Maisano (baritone) and accompanied by chamber orchestra. The cantata, based on the parable of the wise and foolish virgins and texts from the Song of Songs, contains some of Bach’s most beloved and famous music. The choir will also sing works of Palestrina and Lassus. Trinity Church, located at the corner of Chester Road and College Avenue in Swarthmore, welcomes the entire community to join them that evening. Free child care will be provided and a reception will follow the service. For more information, call the parish office at (610) 544-2297.

Festival of Lights at Rose Tree Park

Delaware County’s 40th annual Festival of the Lights opens with a special celebration on Friday, December 2, at 7 p.m. and runs each evening through January 1 from 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

The Delaware County Parks and Recreation staff decorate more than 75 of the park’s trees and set up colorful displays including a gingerbread house, Santa’s sleigh, and Snoopy and the Peanuts gang. Admission is free.

For more information, call (610) 891-4455 or visit co.delaware.pa.us.

‘Peace and Love and Hope Abide’ in Song

Media Chamber Chorale is perfecting its program for two concerts celebrating the holiday season. Directed by John Stroud, the gifted ensemble of 50 local choristers will sing on Friday, December 16, 7:30 p.m. at Wallingford Presbyterian Church, 110 E. Brookhaven Road.

They will sing the next day at 3 p.m. at Swarthmore United Methodist Church, 129 Park Avenue. Refreshments will follow each performance.

Tickets ($13-$18) and information are available at mediachamberchorale.org.

Nature’s Narratives at Scott

Join fellow garden enthusiasts and book lovers on Wednesday, December 7, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. as they discuss books about plants, nature and the environment. The book that will be the topic of discussion at this meeting is titled We Made a Garden.

The book will not be supplied, but one copy is available in the Scott Horticultural Library. This discussion is free and open to the public, however it is limited to 12 people. Advanced registration is required so call (610) 328-8025 to sign up.