Green up Your Garden at SPNDS Plant Sale

Who can resist buying a plant from one of these Swarthmore Presbyterian Nursery Day School students? First row (l. to r.): Ramsay Kadlec, Dugan Smith, Mia Warren and Arden Phipps. Second row (l. to r.): Samuel Grant, Mason Sistare, Andrew Warren and Mitchell Christodouleus.

Who can resist buying a plant from one of these Swarthmore Presbyterian Nursery Day School students? First row (l. to r.): Ramsay Kadlec, Dugan Smith, Mia Warren and Arden Phipps. Second row (l. to r.): Samuel Grant, Mason Sistare, Andrew Warren and Mitchell Christodouleus.

Swarthmore Presbyterian Nursery Day School is taking orders through April 21 for an abundant, healthy and diverse array of garden plants, herbs and vegetables. Proceeds benefit the SPNDS scholarship fund.

Order forms are available online at swarthmorepres.org/spnds.html, or by phone from Tanya Sistare at (610) 543-2861.

Plant pickup will be at SPNDS (727 Harvard Avenue) from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursday, May 4, and from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Friday, May 5.

First Friday, Tonight, March 3

Swarthmore Campus and Community Store
4 South Chester Road, 10 a.m to 7 p.m.
Get ready for spring! Pick up special “Swarthmore” T-shirts in spring colors. Usually $14.99, only $7.00!

Compendium Boutique
6 Park Avenue, 5 p.m to 8 p.m.
Emily Scott of Compendium Boutique is partnering with Swarthmore21 for this Sip, Shop, & Sign event. Grab your girls and come unwind with a glass of bubbly as you browse the Spring ’17 collection. Those registered to vote in Swarthmore can learn more about the referendum and sign the petition. Must be 21+ with a valid ID to receive a glass of champagne. Best of all and in the spirit of Swarthmore21, Emily is offering 21% off all clearance items!

Harvey Oaks Mercantile
102 Park Avenue, 5 p.m to 8 p.m.
Swarthmore21 is also partnering with Lora Pietrangelo, owner of Harvey Oaks Mercantile, to bring you another Sip, Shop, & Sign event at the store. From 5 p.m to 8 p.m. join us and shop for unique gifts and home décor that are responsibly made and well designed. Those registered to vote in Swarthmore can learn more about the referendum and sign the petition. Must be 21+ with a valid ID to receive a glass of wine. And best of all, all purchases made from 5 p.m to 8 p.m. will receive 21% off.

Hobbs
1 Park Avenue, 6:30 p.m.
Hobbs and Ronin Noodle Bar presents Peking Duck, featuring Sang Kee.

Swarthmore Co-op
341 Dartmouth Avenue, 8:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Looking for a fun-filled Friday night? Bring the entire family and/or some friends for a special night of St. Patrick’s Day themed trivia during Quizzo at the Co-op. This is a FREE event, and don’t forget it’s BYOB (must be 21+ to drink)! For more information about Quizzo at the Co-op, call 610-543-9805.

Community Calendar

Acoustic duo Last Chance — Jack Scott and Ingrid Rosenbach — perform at Our Community Cup Coffeehouse at the Chambers Presbyterian Church in Rutledge. See calendar listing for Friday, November 11.

Acoustic duo Last Chance — Jack Scott and Ingrid Rosenbach — perform at Our Community Cup Coffeehouse at the Chambers Presbyterian Church in Rutledge. See calendar listing for Friday, November 11.

Friday, November 11

Front Room Fridays at Furness Library: 2 pm – 4 pm. Adults and teens, come color away your stress at Helen Kate, with mellow music, coloring books and pages, colored pencils and friendly company. Bring your own supplies if you wish. FREE; no registration required. Helen Kate Furness Free Library, 100 N. Providence Road, Wallingford.

Themes in Biology Lecture: 2 pm – 3 pm. Dana Hawley, associate professor of biology at Virginia Tech, speaks on “Behavioral and immunological heterogeneity in house finches: causes and implications for disease dynamics.” FREE and open to all. Science Center 101, Chang Hou Hall, Swarthmore College.

Board Games at Helen Kate Furness: 3:30 pm – 4:45 pm. Showcase Comics returns with last summer’s favorite games like “Evolution” and “Tem Purr A” and some new ones as well. Snacks will be provided. Sign up at the teen table to join. The Helen Kate Furness Library is at 100 N. Providence Road.

Last Chance at Our Community Cup Coffeehouse: 5:30 pm – 9 pm. Acoustic duo Last Chance – Jack Scott of Wallingford and Ingrid Rosenbach of Swarthmore – perform from 7:30- 8:30 p.m. at this gathering place for young adults with disabilities, including autism, Aspergers, etc., their families and caregivers. Reservations/donations: ourcommunitycup.com/coffeehouse-events; info: (610) 246-8939. Chambers Presbyterian Church, 2 Sylvan Avenue, Rutledge.

NEW A Christmas Story at the Media Theatre: 7 pm. (Runs through January 8.) Talented actors young and older, professional and amateur come together in this extravagant production of the musical based on the seasonal classic film. For tickets, call (610) 891-0100 or visit mediatheatre.org. 104 E. State Street, Media.

NEW As You Like It: 8 pm. (Runs through Sunday, November 13.) Swarthmore undergraduates perform Shakespeare’s comedy in original pronunciation. FREE at Pearson Hall Theater, Lang Performing Arts Center, Swarthmore College.

Cooper Harrington-Fei and Natasha Nogueira

Cooper Harrington-Fei and Natasha Nogueira

Recitals: Cooper Harrington-Fei and Natasha Nogueira:  8 pm – 9:30 pm. A joint recital, Cooper Harrington-Fei’s senior recital and Natasha Nogueira’s junior recital, a culmination of years of vocal study, presenting songs by Mozart, Schumann, Hahn, Vaughan Williams, and Argento. Come relax and listen to an hour of wonderful music from different eras. FREE. Lang Music Building, Concert Hall, Swarthmore College campus.

Saturday, November 12

Panther Pajama Run and Pancake Breakfast: 8 am – 11 am. Registration for fundraising 5K run and 1.2 mile walk opens at 8. Races start at 9, breakfast and awards follow at Strath Haven Middle School. Continue the day at the WSSD Wellness Fair across the road at the High School. Info: supportwssd.org.

Swarthmore Farmers Market: 9:30 am – 1:30 pm. Local vendors offer fresh fruit and veg, meats, baked goods and specialty items. This week: kids activity is making a banner; La Mancha Animal Rescue brings adoptable pets; kitchen garden design series by Heidi Barr; music from Matt Wenger (9:30 am) and Hanna Paige (11:30 am) Bonjour Creperie food truck. Info: swarthmorefarmersmarket.org. Swarthmore Town Center, Park and Dartmouth avenues.

Free Food Pantry and Hot Meal: 10 am – Noon. Food pantry provides five days of boxed and canned foods to those in need, and serves a hot meal to boot. FREE. Christ Tabernacle Church, 14 S. Morton Avenue, Morton.

Children: Winnie the Pooh’s Christmas Tail: 11 am. (Runs Sat. and Sun. through Dec. 31.) There’s a lot of goings on in the Hundred Acre Wood, especially because of Eeyore. It seems he has lost his tail so everyone gets into the act to help find it this production at The Media Theatre For tickets, call (610) 891-0100 or visit mediatheatre.org. 104 E. State Street, Media.

Thomas Leiper House Tours: 1 pm – 4 pm. The historic 1785 Thomas Leiper House reopens for the season. Tour guides help you take a look into the past through the lens of the Leiper family, whose patriarch Thomas was a successful entrepreneur in early postcolonial Nether Providence. $1 adults; $.50 children; (610) 566-6365. 521 Avondale Rd, Wallingford.

A Christmas Story at the Media Theatre: 2 pm and 7 pm. (See Friday, November 11.)

Oliver! at the Hedgerow Theatre this weekend only.

Oliver! at the Hedgerow Theatre this weekend only.

NEW Oliver! at the Hedgerow Theatre: 4 pm and 7 pm. (This weekend only.) Enter the world of Dicken’s with Lionel Bart’s music. Tickets: $15, adults; $10, children. The Hedgerow Theater, 64 Rose Valley Road, Rose Valley. Info: hedgerowtheatre.org or (610) 565-4211.

RVCO’s Iolanthe at SHMS: 8 pm. (Runs through November 13.) Rose Valley Chorus and Orchestra begins its 110th season with Gilbert & Sullivan’s operetta, presented onstage with a live pit orchestra in the auditorium at Strath Haven Middle School. Tickets at the door are $7 for children, $17 for seniors, and $20 for adults. Info: rvco.org and (610) 565-5010. 200 S. Providence Road, Wallingford.

As You Like It: 2 pm and 8 pm. (See Friday, November 11.)

Arts and Crafts in Stained Glass: 2 pm – 4 pm. Rose Valley Museum & Historical Society’s lecture by Richard Prigg ($20; $15 for RVMHS members) is followed by a reception at Thunderbird Lodge, 41 Rose Valley Road, Rose Valley.

Todd Fausnacht and the Nephews at War3house3: 7:30 pm. Album release party hosted by Americana artist acoustic guitarist and singer Todd Fausnacht. Tickets $10 advance/$15 door. BYOB; light fare provided. Doors open at 7. Info: War3house3.com and (610) 328-3280. 100 Park Avenue, WH-3, Swarthmore.

Swarthmore College Wind Ensemble

Swarthmore College Wind Ensemble

Swarthmore College Wind Ensemble: 8 pm. Andrew Hauze directs the ensemble in works by Gershwin, Brahms, Holst and Levinson. FREE and open to all. Lang Concert Hall.

Sunday, November 13

Children: Winnie the Pooh’s Christmas Tail: Noon. (See Saturday, November 12.)

Thomas Leiper House Tours: 1 pm – 4 pm. (See Saturday, November 12.)

As You Like It: 2 pm. (Last performance; see Friday, November 11.)

RVCO’s Iolanthe at SHMS: 2 pm. (Last performance; see Saturday, November 12.)

NEW Oliver! at the Hedgerow Theatre: 2 pm and 7 pm. (See Saturday, November 12.)

Board Games at Swarthmore Borough Hall: 2 pm – 5 pm. (Weekly.) Board gaming. Friendly, mostly recently-created “Eurogames,” led by Jim Moskowitz. Adults and kids are welcome; no prior experience necessary. Games are provided, and you can bring your own. FREE. Swarthmore Borough Hall, 121 Park Avenue.

A Christmas Story at Media Theatre: 3 pm. (See Friday, November 11.)

Monday, November 14

Toddler Tales: 10:15 am. Calling parents and caregivers of 2 to 3 1/2 year old toddlers: this active story time is where it’s at on Monday mornings. Books, play, snacks and a special activity each week. FREE. (610) 566-9331. Helen Kate Furness Free Library, 100 N. Providence Road, Wallingford.

Eleanor Joseph

Eleanor Joseph

Living Your Values: Making Life Decisions that Balance Credentials, Tangible Skills, and Passion: 4:30 pm – 6 pm. Eleanor Joseph ’07, CEO & co-founder of Ubuntu Capital, leads this discussion. Ubuntu has launched “Bridge,” a micro-escrow product designed specifically for use in low-trust, informal economies within emerging markets. Using Bridge transaction data, Ubuntu creates a reputation-based credit score-alternative for the under-banked. FREE. The Lang Center, Keith Room, Swarthmore College campus.

Wallingford-Swarthmore School Board Meeting: 7 pm. Twice monthly meeting is open to the community. Strath Haven Middle School Library, 200 S. Providence Road, Wallingford.

Swarthmore Borough Council Meeting: 7:30 pm. Monthly legislative session. Borough Hall, 121 Park Avenue, Swarthmore.

Tuesday, November 15

PAWS for Reading at Furness Library: 4 pm – 5 pm. Students and beginning readers age 5 and up can read to a calm and friendly audience of one. Call or visit in advance to book a 15-minute slot to read to one of PAWS canine pals. (610) 566-9331; 100 N. Providence Road, Wallingford. Race,

Nikhil Singh

Nikhil Singh

War and Power in the American Century: 4:15 pm. NYU professor Nikhil Singh draws on his forthcoming book Exceptional Empire: Race, War and Sovereignty in U.S. Globalism. FREE and open to all. Science Center 101, Chang Hou Hall.

Joan Landis Reads Poetry: 4:30 pm. Poet Joan Landis reads from her collection A Little Glide, FREE at the Swarthmore Campus and Community Store, 4 S. Chester Road.

Bereavement Group (Life Changes): 7 pm – 8 pm. Support group for those who are grieving. Open to the public; $5 contribution. Info, directions, call Pollie Lang (610) 876-1599 or pmlang@verizon.net. Holy Trinity Lutheran Church Lounge, 927 S. Providence Rd., Wallingford.

Wednesday, November 16

Food Collection for Chester Eastside: 8 am – 7 pm. (Each Wednesday.) Donate canned and fresh foods for Chester Eastside Ministries and its community. Swarthmore Co-op, 341 Dartmouth Avenue, Swarthmore.

Dr. Roberta Crooks

Dr. Roberta Crooks

Dr. Roberta Crooks at The Gathering Place: Noon. Learn the Gokhale Method of functional movement from Dr. Crooks. Swarthmore Senior Citizens Association invites all ages to the FREE program. Bring a lunch; dessert and beverage provided. Swarthmore United Methodist Church, 129 Park Avenue.

Staying Safe Online: 7 pm. Information expert Julie Swierczek shares tips and tactics for safeguarding your family’s data and online safety. FREE. Register at (610) 543-0436. Swarthmore Public Library, 121 Park Avenue.

A Christmas Story at the Media Theatre: 7 pm. (See Friday, November 11.)  

Libertarian Charles Murray at Friends Meetinghouse: 7:30 pm. Influential author and political scientist Charles Murray speaks a the invitation of the Swarthmore Conservative Society. Free and open to all. Swarthmore Friends Meetinghouse, 12 Whittier Place.

Swarthmore Planning Commission: 7:30 pm. Monthly meeting at Swarthmore Borough Hall, 121 Park Avenue is open to all.

Thursday, November 17

Meditation at Rotary Club of Swarthmore: Noon. Dr. Balu Athreya will discuss techniques and benefits of mediation. rcswarthmore.org. The Inn at Swarthmore, 10 S. Chester Road.

Preschool/Kindergarten Stories: 1:30 pm and 4 pm. Two sessions on Thursdays meet the demand for this popular story time for 3 1/2-6 year-olds. FREE. (610) 566-9331. Helen Kate Furness Free Library, 100 N. Providence Road, Wallingford.

A Christmas Story at the Media Theatre: 2 pm and 7 pm. (See Friday, November 11.)

David’s Harp – Kantikas de Sefarad: A Concert of Sephardic Music: 4 pm – 5 p m. David’s Harp is a Philadelphia-based ensemble specializing in Jewish music from Turkey, Greece, and the Middle East. Led by Joseph Alpar, the group performs music that has a focus on revealing cultural and religious interactions between Jewish and non-Jewish worlds. FREE. Lang Music Building, Lang Concert Hall, Swarthmore College campus.

Friday, November 18 

Front Room Fridays at Furness Library: 2 pm – 4 pm. (See Friday, November 11.)

Savior Soul at Our Community Cup Coffeehouse: 5:30 pm – 9 pm. Bluegrass, spirituals, gospel and sacred music influence the sound of suburban Philly’s Savior Soul, who perform from 7:30 pm- 8:30 pm at this gathering place for young adults with disabilities, including autism, Aspergers, etc., their families and caregivers. Reservations/donations: ourcommunitycup.com/coffeehouse-events; info: (610) 246-8939. Chambers Presbyterian Church, 2 Sylvan Avenue, Rutledge.

A Christmas Story at the Media Theatre: 7 pm. (See Friday, November 11.)  

Randall Frame of Broomall, Brandon Young of Clifton Heights, Tricia Sullivan of Wilmington and Annaliese Gove of Wallingford celebrate a birthday in The Dining Room at the Players Club of Swarthmore.

Randall Frame of Broomall, Brandon Young of Clifton Heights, Tricia Sullivan of Wilmington and Annaliese Gove of Wallingford celebrate a birthday in The Dining Room at the Players Club of Swarthmore.

NEW The Dining Room at the Players Club of Swarthmore: 8 pm. (Runs through November 27.) A.R. Gurney’s 1981 play, directed by Anthony San Filippo, will be presented on the Raymond W. Smith state, upstairs at the Players Club, 614 Fairview Road. Admission: $10 at the door. Reservations can be made at pcstheater.org; (610) 328-4134. Please note that the stage is not handicap accessible.

EXHIBITS

NEW Literary Aviary at McCabe Library. (Through December 22.) Birds of all feathers are collected in this exhibition of items from Swarthmore College libraries’ collections. McCabe Library lobby, Swarthmore College.

Night Window–Red Curtain, 1972 Falling Window Sash, 1992. Oil on linen, 66 x 36 inches Oil on linen, 60 x 38 inches.

Lisa Dodd: Night Window–Red Curtain, 1972 Falling Window Sash, 1992. Oil on linen, 66 x 36 inches Oil on linen, 60 x 38 inches.

Lois Dodd: Windows and Reflections. (Through December 15.) “Windows and Reflections” surveys many decades of paintings by eminent American figurative artist Lois Dodd. List Gallery, Lang Performing Arts Center, Swarthmore College.

Abstract Painting Exhibition at CAC. (Runs through November 23.) “Interpretations of Memory and Place” features the paintings of Georganna Lenssen and Robert Chavez. FREE and open to the public. Gallery hours are Mon.-Thurs.: 9 am-7:30 pm, Friday: 9 am-3 pm, and Saturday: 10 am-2 pm. communityartscenter.org. Community Arts Center, 414 Plush Mill Road, Wallingford.

Review: ‘At Home At the Zoo’ at Spotlight

Ann (Emily West) and Peter (Eric Rupp) try to revive their relationship in Spotlight Theatre’s production of At Home At the Zoo.

Ann (Emily West) and Peter (Eric Rupp) try to revive their relationship in Spotlight Theatre’s production of At Home At the Zoo.

By Louise L. Coffin

Spotlight Theatre’s current production of At Home at the Zoo is Edward Albee’s two-act combination of his 1959 play, The Zoo Story, and his 2004 “prequel,” Homelife. His first major hit, The Zoo Story, apparently felt unfinished to its author, who, more than four decades later, wrote the partially explanatory preface. The character Peter bridges the acts; his wife Ann appears only in the first; the down-and-out stranger Jerry only in the second.

While the first act has its humorous moments, the scenario gradually grows darker and more disturbing. The second act begins ominously, then becomes more frenzied and brutal.

Spotlight’s production brings out, in no uncertain terms, the themes of the inability to connect and communicate with another; of the desperate need to explain oneself, fearing not to be understood, and all too often failing to be.

As Ann, Emily West speaks her opening line, “We should talk,” with humor underscored with distress. With a strong sureness, West reveals Ann’s increasingly insistent demands, as she struggles to make sense of and revive a moribund relationship. West’s spot-on characterization makes the audience feel Ann’s frustration.

Eric Rupp plays Peter as the unwilling-to-be-involved husband who would rather be anywhere but “here.” Finally provoked beyond his control, Rupp consummately ramps up his character into a utterly believable man filled with personal demons. Indeed, Rupp makes us understand the anguished and inevitable conclusion.

At his entrance, Thomas-Robert Irvin, cast as Jerry, immediately fills the audience with dread. His physical presence, his mannerisms, the various pitches and cadences of his voice all serve to emphasize a growing sense of doom. Irvin’s performance is a tour de force of character realization.

How fortunate we are to have Spotlight Theatre in our town. The upcoming season includes Happy Birthday, Wanda June; The Miracle Worker; Cabaret; and four other productions. along with a sprinkling of improv nights and special events.

Saturday evening’s performance of Albee was a truly professional one. If you value good theater, strong acting, and are unafraid of thought-provoking material, hie yourselves to Swarthmore Methodist Church, Spotlight’s convenient venue, tonight or tomorrow night (July 29 or 30). After that, your opportunity is gone.

Please be aware that At Home at the Zoo contains profanity, sexual references, and violence. It is not suitable for children.

A Note About the Graduation Issue

If your student is missing from the graduation issue, I would like you to know why.

The school board decided to give the students the choice to “opt out” or “opt in” with their name, photo and college destination.

From what we understand, the decision was made in order to alleviate the stress on juniors trying to figure out what schools to visit based on data they have about the previous year’s graduates.

For the last couple of decades, the graduates’ names, photos and colleges have been a regular feature in the graduation issue. We consider it our gift to the community.

This year we received the list from WSSD with instructions per student. Some wanted no information published; some wanted name and photo only; and some wanted no photo, but name and plans.

For 26 years, I have been putting together the graduation issue. Each student and picture are dealt with individually. Once the initial setup is complete, it is difficult to make changes, so it is important that deadlines are honored so that everyone is included however she or he wishes. And, I have tried to accommodate everyone’s wishes.

On our end, we have no idea if parents were involved with their child’s decision. Our information comes from the WSSD administration.

— Diane Madison

PCS Children’s Theater Presents a Modern ‘Sleeping Beauty’

Carli Anderson of Audubon, Kara McGee of Swarthmore, Avery Leach of Clifton Heights and John Parkinson of Springfield.

Carli Anderson of Audubon, Kara McGee of Swarthmore, Avery Leach of Clifton Heights and John Parkinson of Springfield are members of the cast of PCS Children’s Theatre production of Sleeping Beauty: The Time Traveler and Her New Millennium Prince.

Everyone is familiar with the tale of Sleeping Beauty, but what if she had the opportunity to wake up in the unfamiliar world of today? Find out by taking a short trip to the Players Club of Swarthmore.

Sleeping Beauty: The Time Traveler and Her New Millennium Prince is an upbeat and fun musical fairy tale that is sure to entertain the littlest audience members, as well as the little kid inside all of the adults.

With music by Deborah Wicks La Puma and lyrics by Andrea Dodd combined with Janet Stanford’s storytelling, this family-friendly show is a great start to the Players Clubs trio of Children’s Theatre productions taking place this summer.

In this new-telling of the classic fairy tale, Rolly is a typical 5th grader whose boring summer vacation turns into a terrific adventure when he stumbles on the past and finds himself in the Age of Charlemagne. There he encounters a feisty 12-year-old girl who yearns to be a knight and travel to the edge of the world.

However, her parents, the king and queen, are oddly protective and will not allow the princess to leave the castle walls. Together, the young people plan to run away to Rolly’s world, the Age of Computers. They are stopped by the king and queen, who reveal the secret curse that was laid on the princess at birth: that she will one day prick her finger on a spindle and sleep for a thousand years. At last, Rolly and Princess Aurora are united in the present day, destined for “happily ever after.”

This interactive musical, recommended for children age 3 and up, is scheduled to run eight performances: Saturdays, June 11 and June 18, and Sundays, June 12 and June 19, with two performances each day at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m.

All performances are on the Players Club’s Raymond W. Smith Stage on the second floor. Adult tickets are $10 each and children under 12 are $8, cash or check only. All tickets are sold at the door on the day of the performance.

More information can be found at www.pcstheater.org. The Players Club of Swarthmore is located at 614 Fairview Road.

Swarthmore College Seniors Lean Forward Beneath Perfect Skies

Maurice Eldridge at the Class of 2016 Commencement on the campus of Swarthmore College on Sunday,May 29, 2016, in Swarthmore, Pa. (Laurence Kesterson / staff photographer)

Fifty-five years after his own Swarthmore College graduation, this was the final commencement procession for Maurice Eldridge, Swarthmore College’s former vice president for college and community relations. He retires after a stellar career — spent in large part at the college — as a leader and administrator in academia, where as one observer notes, “he made his colleagues better, directed many students toward fulfillment and success, and promoted town and gown mutually.” Photo by Laurence Kesterson

On a lovely May morning at the Scott Amphitheatre, Swarthmore College’s Class of 2016 last Sunday came to the end of their shared undergraduate academic journey, and began their individual journeys from Swarthmore to destinations both intended and unforeseen. The class of 2016 included 359 graduates, 346 of whom received Bachelor of Arts degrees and 25, Bachelor of Science in engineering. (There were twelve double degrees.)

Chosen by her fellow seniors as commencement speaker, Honors English major and writer Rose Wunrow confronted the challenge of her office, and addressed it creatively. “There’s no way to ‘sum it all up.’ But thinking of Swarthmore’s values, and its belief in consensus and collection as a way to bring our perspectives together,” she said, she sought classmates’ musings on “what you will miss about Swarthmore, what you are ready to leave behind; … your favorite Swarthmore memories; what you want to carry forward with you.”

Class of 2016 Commencement on the campus of Swarthmore College on Sunday,May 29, 2016, in Swarthmore, Pa. (Laurence Kesterson / staff photographer)

Seniors awaiting sheepskins. Photo by Laurence Kesterson

She wove together a tapestry of the moments of joy and heartbreak, giddiness and enlightenment they described, concluding “that Swarthmore is a place where you can often unexpectedly find echoes of yourself in other people, while recognizing what makes our experiences unique.”

Wunrow quoted Jack Kerouac in closing, as she and the class of 2016 prepared to hit the road: “What is that feeling when you’re driving away from people and they recede on the plain till you see their specks dispersing? It’s the too-huge world vaulting us, and it’s good-bye. But we lean forward to the next crazy venture beneath the skies.”

Class of 2016 Commencement on the campus of Swarthmore College on Sunday,May 29, 2016, in Swarthmore, Pa. (Laurence Kesterson / staff photographer)

Senior engineers pulled their traditional prank, rigging the Clothier bells to ring at the push of a bright red panic button. Photo by Laurence Kesterson

Swarthmore College President Valerie Smith differentiated between the formal and serendipitous aspects of the college experience of the seniors. “Your academics and your organized activities are your foreground experiences … background experiences shape you as well … Years from now, you may be surprised to find that, in your memory, these background experiences make their way to the foreground, while others fade away. We cannot always anticipate, plan, and predict the moments that will shape us. What matters is that we are fully present for each of these counters, whether big or small.”

Knowledge is but one takeaway for the graduating seniors, Smith said. “As you leave this place, take time to reflect on the ways that it has shaped you. And as you move forward into the next stage of your life, I urge you to cultivate the habits of open-mindedness and open-heartedness you’ve learned in our residential community … This habit of mind can help us to perceive the web of connection that binds our moments to each other; it can hone our intuition; and it can cultivate our sense of compassion towards others.”

Commencement for the class of 2016 in the Scott Amphitheater on the campus of Swarthmore College in Swarthmore, Pa on Sunday, May 29, 2016. (Photo by Dan Z. Johnson) 2016_05_28_Swarthmore_Commencement 2016 ©2016 Dan Z. Johnson 267-772-9441 www.danzphoto.net dan@danzphoto.net

Ben Marks ‘16 received his diploma from college president Valerie Smith. Photo by Dan Johnson

Political science professor Cindy Halpern addressed the senior class at Saturday’s Baccalaureate services. Senior Joe Boninger and retiring Dorwin P. Cartwright Professor Barry Schwartz were chosen by seniors to speak at a Last Collection on Friday, at the point of their departure from a college community which has nurtured and benefited from the presence of each.

President Valerie Smith awarded honorary degrees to three eminent scholars with connections to the college (photos by Laurence Kesterson):

Honorary degree recipient Leo Braudy '63 at the Class of 2016 Commencement on the campus of Swarthmore College on Sunday,May 29, 2016, in Swarthmore, Pa. (Laurence Kesterson / staff photographer)

Honorary degree recipient Leo Braudy ’63. (Laurence Kesterson / staff photographer)

• Doctor of Human Letters to cultural historian and film critic Leo Braudy from the class of 1963;

• Doctor of Sciences to climate change researcher and ecologist F. Stuart “Terry” Chapin III from the class of 1966; and

• Doctor of Humane Letters to linguistic and cultural researcher Carol Padden, a longtime adviser to Swarthmore College professors and mentor to students, who delivered her address in American Sign Language.

Honorary degree recipient E Stuart Chapin III '66 at the Class of 2016 Commencement on the campus of Swarthmore College on Sunday,May 29, 2016, in Swarthmore, Pa. (Laurence Kesterson / staff photographer)

Honorary degree recipient E Stuart Chapin III ’66. (Laurence Kesterson / staff photographer)

Honorary degree recipient Carol Padden at the Class of 2016 Commencement on the campus of Swarthmore College on Sunday,May 29, 2016, in Swarthmore, Pa. (Laurence Kesterson / staff photographer)

Honorary degree recipient Carol Padden(Laurence Kesterson / staff photographer)

Letters to the Editor…

Question of variable abilities

To the Editor:

We read in The Swarthmorean (May 13) that “Special Education” programs deal with “disability,” a “stepwise education” and the “transition to work.”

But would it not be more accurate as well as less shaming to say “variable ability” rather than “disability”; for surely many students’ abilities do not coincide with predetermined standards. And don’t the steps in a stepwise educational program vary enormously depending on the “various” abilities and possible programs? And is work training the primary goal? Doesn’t this depend on the highly variable abilities of the students?

Isn’t the education of an informed responsible citizen in a representative democracy the primary goal of a public education?

John Brodsky
Swarthmore

5-20 gillespie pic

Swarthmore-Rutledge School students visit The Gathering Place.

Young artists teach seniors at TGP

To the Editor:

Last Wednesday, May 11, I was invited to visit The Gathering Place, which is a community organization run by the Swarthmore Senior Citizens Association. This year, I brought my 4th grade seminar students for a fun-filled intergenerational exchange.

Our art teacher Bridget Hochstoeger and I collaborated on a math/art lesson that we shared with the seniors. The students recently studied symmetry and more specifically, radial symmetry. They learned about geometry, number of orders, degrees, angles, circumference, etc. We discussed patterns in art, color and balance. We also practiced measurement utilizing our ruler and protractor skills.

Members of the 4th grade classroom are: Emil Hartung, Joseph Lynch, Andrew Deppen, Arnie Berger, Eden Stolar, Caeli Rieger, Audrey Stevens, Evan Yavor, Anna Benner, Dexter Braun, Samantha Edwards, Jillian Surkis, and Amanda Anckaitis.

The students became the teachers and instructed a group of seniors on how to create beautiful radial designs. Following their lesson, they all enjoyed a snack together. It was a wonderful way for our children to learn the value of giving back to their community.

Linda Gillespie
Gifted Education Teacher
Swarthmore-Rutledge School

5-20 Gathering 4th graders

At The Gathering Place last week, young met old and math met art. Linda Gillespie, 4th grade teacher at Swarthmorean-Rutledge School, visited with her students in the gifted program for lunch and a shared art project. Students and many of the post-school regulars at The Gathering Place applied artistic skills to developing symmetrical pictures based on interwoven geometric shapes. Photo by Gudrun Weinberg

Swarthmore Borough Council Meeting Agenda

MONDAY, May 9
Borough Hall • 7:30 p.m.

Agenda

• Consideration of Resolution 2016-07 Endorsing Redistricting Reform

• Appointment to Pension Committee

• Authorization to Advertise Ordinance 1077 providing Police Services to the Borough of Rutledge

• Consideration of Bids for 2016 Street Paving Program

• Financial Report

• Manager’s Report

If you are a person with a disability and wish to attend this meeting of Borough Council and require an auxiliary aid or service to participate in the proceedings, please contact Borough Manager Jane Billings at 610-543-4599 to discuss how the Borough may best accommodate your needs.